Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cicy.repositorioinstitucional.mx/jspui/handle/1003/945
Prioritizing the conservation of epiphytic bromeliads using ethnobotanical information from a traditional mexican market
DEMETRIA MARTHA MONDRAGON CHAPARRO
ELIA MARIA DEL CARMEN MENDEZ GARCIA
IVON MERCEDES RAMIREZ MORILLO
Acceso Abierto
Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas
DOI: 10.1007/s12231-016-9332-4
BROMELIACEAE
ETHNOBOTANY
MEXICOVASCULAR EPIPHYTES
The study of traditional markets is a useful tool in the development of studies on species management and conservation because it allows us to identify the species under collection pressure as well as the intensity of their collection. The “Mercado de Jamaica” in Mexico City, Mexico, is one of the main places where cut flowers and foliage are sold. Given that wild bromeliads commercialized in Mexico originate from natural populations, their collection has put certain species at risk, and developing management and conservation programs for them has become an urgent priority. Hence, we carried out an ethnobotanical study focused exclusively on bromeliads used as cut flowers and/or foliage. To obtain information on the species, plant parts, number of plants sold, and vendor characteristics, we made monthly visits to the Mercado de Jamaica over a year (January 2014 to January 2015) to conduct semistructured interviews with bromeliad vendors. We also bought species samples for taxonomic identification. Twelve species belonging to the genus Tillandsia L. were identified, 66% of which are endemic to Mexico. Approximately 60,300 inflorescences and/or whole plants are sold per year. Tillandsia punctulata Schltdl. & Cham. was sold the most (16,200 plants), followed by Tillandsia makoyana Baker (9,200 inflorescences). Sale prices varied between MXN 10–70 (Mexican pesos). Bromeliads were collected from the states of Veracruz, Puebla, and Michoacán. Of the 10 bromeliad vendors, 60% were collectors between 26 and 65 years old. The collection of wild bromeliads for sale as cut flowers or foliage could have a strong impact on the conservation of these species because of the loss of adult individuals—adulthood being the most vulnerable stage in the life cycles of these plants. This loss, along with the loss of inflorescences, which eliminates the seeds that give rise to new individuals and constantly colonize new trees, could threaten the survival of epiphytic bromeliad populations.
2016
Artículo
Economic botany, 70(1), 29-36, 2016
Inglés
Mondragón, D., del Carmen Méndez-García, E. M., & Morillo, I. R. (2016). Prioritizing the Conservation of Epiphytic Bromeliads Using Ethnobotanical Information from a Traditional Mexican Market. Economic botany, 70(1), 29-36.
CIENCIAS DE LA VIDA
Versión publicada
publishedVersion - Versión publicada
Appears in Collections:Artículos de Investigación Arbitrados

Upload archives


File SizeFormat 
id38475_Mondragon_Chaparro_2016.pdf215.29 kBAdobe PDFView/Open